Advanced Comparative Literature

The topic will change from term to term, depending upon the instructor, but all will have a specifically comparative dimension and may include study of a genre, form (including film), comparison of authors, inquiry into a critical problem, exploration of a theme, or examination of a period.

This course emphasizes advanced techniques to develop students' critical reading, writing, and textual analysis with particular focus on argument and research-based writing.

Readings: 
Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis, Zora Neal Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, Truman Capote's In Cold Blood, Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Jack Womack's Random Acts of Senseless Violence, Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray, James Baldwin's Sonny's Blues, Kate Chopin's The Story of An Hour and A Respectable Woman, Sandra Cisneros The House On Mango Street, J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye
Media Used: 
Their Eyes Were Watching God (2008 film version), One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (film), The Picture of Dorian Gray (film)
Interim Assessments: 

1 literary analysis paper examining the use of literary devices and responding to the treatment of our essential questions in The Metamorphosis;
1 literary analysis paper examining the use of literary devices and responding to the treatment of our essential questions in Kafka’s Metamorphosis and a second literary work the students read together in their literature circles

Significant Assignments: 

Logs and responses to teacher comments on logs;
revisions of chosen entries into longer pieces of writing;
Information reporting on an author’s work and biography as relevant to the text being used;
Rewriting sections of selected literary works to reflect student experiences, each with two revisions;
Students will respond to questions generated by the teacher and by their own note taking, usually written in class;
Keep a journal that’s dated, organized, and thorough in relation to quotations from the book being read;
Students will write reflect on their writing and learning process throughout the course;
Produce creative writing pieces using the author's style or voice

Significant Activities or Projects: 

Work together in literature circles or book groups to discuss the group's book and engage in accountable talk;
Keep group logs and discussion sheets chronicling the events and specific information shared during each group discussion;
Engage in Socratic Seminars and fishbowl discussions that are evaluated by other literature circle groups;
Final literary analysis comparing/contrasting the characters, events, author's use of literary devices in two major literary works

Sample PBATs: 
An original student thesis that seeks to analyze two literary works using textual evidence from the works and outside literary criticism/analysis
A response to a critical lens or an essential question, using textual evidence to support one's views